Dual Credit Courses

Take courses at CNC while attending high school!

The Dual Credit program is an avenue for grade 12 students in good academic standing to take post-secondary level courses in their last year of high school. This program is a partnership between CNC and School District 57 that allows the student to use credit from the post-secondary course towards both their high school diploma and future post-secondary credentials.

Things to Know:

  • Students can take one course per semester.
  • We recommend students who plan to enroll in the Dual Credit program have no more than three high school courses in the semester that they take courses at CNC.
  • English Studies 12 should be completed as early as possible (last semester of Grade 11, before Dual Credit program starts, if possible).
  • Students interested in pursuing science based courses (such a Biology, Chemistry, and Calculus) must have the appropriate grade 12 pre-requisite course completed before starting the post-secondary equivalent at CNC.
    • Example: If interested in taking first-year chemistry within the Dual Credit program, a student would want to have completed Chemistry 12 by the end of their grade 11 year, which would then allow them to take CHEM 111 in the first semester and CHEM 112 in the second semester of grade 12, thus having completed their entire first year of post-second chemistry by the time they graduate high school.

Application Process

  • Students interested in the Dual Credit program should consult with their high school counsellor as soon as possible to ensure that their high school courses are laid out in the best manner possible, completing some courses early if possible and ensuring a reasonable workload while they are in the Dual Credit program.
  • Students will require the signature of their high school counsellor, principal, and parent/guardian before the application can be forwarded to CNC (admissions@cnc.bc.ca).
  • Once the application has be received by admissions at CNC, the student will be contacted by a CNC advisor to set up an appointment to review the application and select appropriate class(es).

Available Courses

ABST-100
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
History and Traditions of the Carrier People. This course is based on the traditional knowledge holders of our communities who are versed in the traditional ways of knowing that is not written down in any text but passed down through oral traditions. The course provides students with an in-depth study of Yinka Dene culture, language, spirituality, community, and social structures. Elders and topics will focus on the Yinka Dene of the north central interior of British Columbia.
PREREQUISITES:
COREQUISITES:
 
NOTES:
Other notes about this course.
ABST-101
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course focuses on the diversity and development of Aboriginal communities and organizations in Canada. Attention is placed on the nature of Aboriginal /Euro-Canadian interactions from contact to present day in order for students to understand contemporary perspectives and issues relevant to Aboriginal peoples.
ANTH-101
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
Sociocultural anthropologists examine social patterns and practices across cultures, with a special interest in how people live in particular places and create meaning. The goal of this course is to examine the diversity of existing human cultures as well as provide students with a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts used by sociocultural anthropologists. Topics include research methods, economic systems, marriage, kinship, political systems, expressive culture, religion, illness, and gender. Examples will be drawn from a variety of societies.
ANTH-102
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course provides a broad introduction to two of anthropology's sub-fields - physical anthropology and archaeology with a focus on how these sub-fields work together. During this course you will examine topics such as: the anthropological perspective; fieldwork and research methods; evolutionary theory; living primates; hominid evolution; archaic and modern Homo sapiens; human variation, and the origins of food production, settled life, and cities. Examples will be drawn from different cultures to explore these topics.
BIO-107
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
An introductory course emphasizing principles of wide applications to all organisms, including cell structure and function, nutrition, energetics, and physiology and reproduction. Examples are drawn from both the cellular and whole organism levels of organization. The laboratory will explore biological principles through a study of several local ecosystems; field trips during laboratory sessions will be mandatory. Prerequisites: Biology 11 or 045 and Chemistry 11 or 045
BIO-120
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
An introductory course exploring topics in the mechanism of inheritance at the organismal and molecular levels, evidence for and mechanisms of evolution, ecological relationships, and animal behaviour. The laboratory will include several long-term investigations, including laboratory experiments on organism? environmental relationships and optional field work. Prerequisites: Biology 11 or 045 and Chemistry 11 or 045
BIO-111
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is the first half of a comprehensive survey of the structures and functions of the human organ systems. Lecture topics include cellular physiology, histology, and studies of the integumentary, skeletal, nervous, and endocrine systems. An extensive laboratory component is included. This course is appropriate for students who intend to enter Health Sciences programs. Prerequisites: Biology 12 or BIO 050 or BIO 107; and Chemistry 11 or CHEM 045
BIO-112
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is a continuation of Human Anatomy and Physiology I. It is designed to cover the anatomy and physiology of the muscular, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. The emphasis is on the importance of homeostasis and how it is maintained by the concerted functioning of body systems. A laboratory component is included. Prerequisite: BIO 111
BIO-130
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is an admission requirement for the Practical Nurse program as of September 2012. This course gives an overview of the structure and function of ten body systems. It also encourages various health promotion strategies that work toward the optimal funcitoning of these systems. Prerequisite: Biology 12 or BIO 050 with a grade of C or better
CHEM-111
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is designed for students who have taken a Chemistry 12 equivalent course within the past 2 years. Topics covered include the electronic structure of atoms, trends of the periodic table, modern bonding theories, intermolecular forces and organic chemistry. A strong understanding of stoichiometry is recommended. Students who take this course cannot take CHEM 113 for additional credit. Prerequisites: Chemistry 12 or CHEM 050 and Pre-Calculus 12 or MATH 100 or MATH 050; with a "C" or better
CHEM-112
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
Together with CHEM 111, this course provides credit for first-year university chemistry. Topics covered include thermochemistry and chemical thermodynamics, properties of solutions, solution stoichiometry and aqueous equilibria, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibrium, electrochemistry and reaction kinetics. Students who take this course cannot take CHEM 114 for additional credit. Prerequisite: CHEM 111
COM-100
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
The student examines a broad overview of the Canadian business system: how it functions and how it relates to specific areas such as marketing, production, finance and human resources. The student will gain specific insights into actual business operations and some of the major areas of concern regarding the role of business in society including globalization, corporate social responsibility, entrepreneurship and small business development.
COM-204
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
Introduction to accounting procedures, principles and financial statement preparation, and the analysis of accounting information for business decision-making. Emphasis is on accounting policies and generally accepted accounting principles.
CRIM-101
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary subject of criminology. The topics explored include a historical analysis of the development of criminology as a scientific discipline, its methods of analysis, and the various theoretical explanations for crime, criminality, and social control. The course will also focus on current issues related to crime and the administration of criminal justice.
CRIM-103
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
An introduction to the legal and social organization of the Canadian criminal justice system. The accused is followed from initial contact with the police to a final disposition on the street, at court, or in the correctional system. The rights, respon sibilities, and discretion of all participants in the proceedings will be examined in detail. The processing and treatment of offenders in Canada will be evaluated in terms of fairness and effectiveness.
CRIM-135
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course provides a general introduction to the fundamental and competing principles of jurisprudence and to the basic legal institutions of Canada. The course is designed to prepare students for those law and law-related courses offered within the Department of Criminology and will consider the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts, and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, the course considers the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, principles of statutory interpretation, and will also introduce the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. The course also examines the process of law reform in Canada.
CSC-109
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This is a general introductory course in computer science. Topics include computer architecture, computer systems, development of algorithms and computer programs, and programming style. Programming topics include selection and loop structures, arrays, functions, procedures, and string processing. The main emphasis of this course is on the study and development of algorithms, using a procedural language. Prerequisite: Math 12 or MATH 050 or MATH 100. Students with a grade of "B" or better in CSC 12 may take CSC 110 instead of CSC 109. ETCC 159 students who have completed Electronics Technician Core meet all prerequisites for this course. Prerequisite: (effective Sept. 15, 2012): Foundations of Math 12 or Pre-calculus 12 or MATH 050 or MATH 100 or equivalent
CSC-110
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This is a continuation of CSC 109 - more advanced algorithms and computer programs are developed. Topics include advanced string processing, sets, recursion, and linear and non-linear data structures. Prerequisite: CSC 109 or a grade of "B" or better in CSC 12 Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 101
CUE-101
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
The course provides both first-time and returning students with specific skills and strategies needed to accomplish their academic goals with greater success. Students are introduced to a variety of topics critical to student success, including, but not limited to, time management, planning and goal-setting, learning styles, test-taking, and study techniques. The purpose of this course is to give students an opportunity to cultivate the skills, values, and attitudes necessary to become confident, capable students and contributing community members. In addition, the course opens the door to learning as a lifelong process. It specifically assists in guiding students through the critical thinking process, culminating in a practical application: researching, developing, writing, and presenting a proposal for change within our college community.
DENO-150
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course provides information and practical experience in the field of dentistry. It is designed to orient students to current dental health concepts and to practicing as a member of the dental team. Note: Delivery of this course is dependent upon sufficient numbers of registrants.
ENGL-103
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
A study of grammar, composition, and style. A vigorous program of essay-writing plus a variety of writing assignments or exercises dealing with specific problems in essay-writing. Strongly recommended for students who wish to improve their writing skills.
ENGL-104
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
A survey of selected stories, poems, and plays from the classical to the modern periods. Another first-year college level English course is suggested. Students will write essays and exams. Students wishing to transfer to UBC should not take both English 104 and English 107.
ENGL-106
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
A survey of styles and genres in international and Hollywood cinema from 1940 to the present. A feature film will be screened each week and discussed in conjunction with assigned readings. University credit students will write essays and exams; non-university credit students may audit the course for general interest.
ENGL-107
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course surveys Aboriginal literature. Students assess traditional tales from an oral storytelling tradition, as well as poems, plays, and short stories by contemporary writers. As well, students learn effective composition skills and the techniques of literary analysis.
ENGL-108
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
A survey of selected novels, short stories, poems, and graphic novels from genres such as Horror, Mystery, Erotica, Thriller, Western, Fantasy, Science Fiction, War, Auto Fiction, etc. Students will write essays and exams to reflect an understanding of how to read, analyze, and discuss literature and themes.
FINE-101
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
Art history, a broad intellectual discipline, is central to the humanities. This introductory survey course will examine, analyze, and evaluate the major time periods, movements, and trends in the visual arts (primarily painting, sculpture, and architecture) of both western and nonwestern civilizations from prehistory through the Late Medieval period. In addition to the stylistic and structural components of art, students will study, through lectures and class discussion, historical, social, religious, political, technological, philosophical, and gender issues integral and related to the production and development of art.
FINE-102
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This introductory survey course continues to examine, analyze, and evaluate the major time periods, movements, and trends in the visual arts (primarily painting, sculpture, and architecture) of both western and non-western civilizations from the Early Renaissance to the present. In addition to the stylistic and structural components of art, students will study, through lectures and class discussion, historical, social, religious, political, technological, philosophical, and gender issues integral and related to the production and development of art.
FREN-120
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is designed for students who have no knowledge of the French language and those who have not completed Grade 11 French or its equivalent. The course consists of listening comprehension and oral production, as well as reading, writing, and using French grammar. The emphasis is on communicative practice during class time. Students will be given lots of opportunities to speak the language as soon as they learn it (asking questions, reading dialogues, role-plays, and pronunciation). The explanation of grammar is done in situation or in context. During labs, students can practice their listening tasks by completing activity sheets. Students will be able to borrow cassettes or CDs for individual practice according to their needs. Prerequisite: None
FREN-121
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
With its emphasis on training in listening comprehension and oral production, this course is also designed for students who have studied French previously, allowing them to refresh their language skills, particularly their communicative abilities. The course also consists of reading, writing, and applying grammar rules in short compositions. During labs, students can practice their listening tasks by completing activity sheets. Students will be able to borrow cassettes or CDs for individual practice according to their needs. Prerequisite: French 120 or equivalent. If in doubt, please consult with the instructor or a counsellor.
GEOG-101
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course serves as an introduction to the development, structure, concepts, and methods of modern human geography. Students are introduced to the many sub-fields of human geography, including urban geography, cultural geography, environmental geography, historical geography, regional geography, political geography, and economic geography. This course is not only important to those students who wish to study for a BA in geography; it will prove useful for those students who wish to enter programs in architecture, urban and regional planning, education, etc.
GEOG-103
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
Description coming soon
HIST-101
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
A survey of significant events from the 1890s to 1939, with particular emphasis on the First World War, the instability of the 1920s and 1930s, the rise of Japan, and the road to the Second World War.
HIST-102
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
A sequel to HIST 101, covering the Second World War, struggles in the Third World, America's victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and the emergence of new superpowers in Japan and the European Union.
HIST-104
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
A sequel to HIST 103. Emphasis is placed on Confederation, the Riel Rebellion, immigration, urbanization and industrialization, and the evolution of foreign policy.
MATH-100
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is an introduction to algebra, analytic geometry and trigonometry. It serves as the prerequisite for the two-semester science-based calculus sequence for science students, or as a university-credit mathematics elective for non-science students. Topics covered include algebraic number systems, algebra of real numbers, fundamental principle of analytic geometry, geometry of the real line, equations and inequalities, plane synthetic and analytic geometry, functions and graphs and linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, root, algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions.
MATH-101
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is an introduction to the theory, techniques, and applications of differential calculus. It constitutes the first half of the two-semester first-year calculus sequence for students studying pure or applied science. Together, Math 101 and Math 102 satisfy the first-year mathematics requirement in all university transfer science and applied science programs. Topics include theory of limits, continuous and differentiable functions, algebraic and transcendental functions, basic optimization theory, and applications.
MATH-104
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is an introduction to the theory, techniques and applications of elementary statistics and statistical methodology. It is intended primarily for students majoring in health sciences, business, and liberal arts programs. Topics include descriptive statistics, sampling, elementary probability, probability distributions, statistical inference, correlation, linear regression and analysis of variance. Applications to a wide variety of real-world problems are emphasized.
MGT-157
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course focuses on the foundations of management theory. Management is presented as a discipline and as a process. The course introduces the key issues of management from the essential skills to management ethics. Major topic areas will include the foundations of planning and decision making, organizational design, managing change and innovation, leadership, motivation, communications, supervision, and control of operations.
MKT-152
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is an introduction to marketing activities in modern business firms. The major topics covered are target markets and segmentation, consumer behaviour, research and information systems, and the marketing mix. Throughout the course, emphasis is on the application of concepts and perspectives to current business problems and opportunities, through case studies and projects.
PHIL-100
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
PHIL 100 is designed to introduce students to philosophy as a study discipline. Core questions will be asked: Is there a God? What is morality? How important is knowledge to truth? Are humans capable of knowing everything? Are humans mere material beings, or is there a non-material aspect to human life? What is justice? What is a civil society? What is politics? Students will be introduced to some of the best minds who have offered insight and understanding on these issues. PHIL 100 will arouse interest in students for this field of study, its benefits to learning, and career development.
PHIL-101
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
An inquiry into the nature and justification of moral standards. No conduct is legal or illegal apart from our making it so. Is any conduct morally right or wrong apart from our thinking it so? Is there a correct method of distinguishing right from wrong? Must morality be based on religion? Why should happiness rather than virtue be thought to be the highest good? Can an action be morally wrong even if it harms no one?
PHIL-102
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
An examination of skeptical doubts concerning the possibility of knowledge. What distinguishes knowledge from opinion? Does evidence have to convince everyone before it constitutes proof? Does what is true depend on what people regard as true? Can perception show us how the world really is or merely how it appears to creatures like us? Should we believe only what there is sufficient evidence to support? How is faith related to knowledge and belief?
PHIL-115
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
A foundational course in the study of religion intended as an introduction to the religions that have a significant following and/or influence in our world.
PSYC-101
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This general survey course includes topics such as a brief history of psychology, basic research methodology, biological psychology, sensation, perception, consciousness, learning, memory, language and thought.
PSYC-102
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is a continuation of PSYC 101. Topics include developmental psychology, intelligence and intelligence testing, personality and personality assessment, motivation, emotion, stress and health, social psychology, an introduction to psychological disorders and their treatment.
PSCI-100
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is designed to provide students with a basic foundation in the study of politics, government and society. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the complex world of politics, in order to develop the skills required to critically assess questions related to ideology, social justice, political organization, government policies and decisions. By learning about the essential concepts of politics, and the processes of government, students will develop the skills to be engaged yet critical citizens. Although much of the emphasis will be on Canadian politics, we will be focusing on political developments in other parts of the world.
SOC-101
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
An introduction to the basic sociological theories and methods for studying individuals, groups, and institutions. Topics will include culture, socialization, families, education, gender, aging, and deviance. These concerns will be illustrated and developed with Canadian materials.
SOC-102
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
A continuation of SOC 101. Topics described and explained include the characteristics and changes in the general population, local communities, ethnic groups, social movements, political parties, work settings, and religious organizations. These concerns will be illustrated and developed with Canadian materials. Prerequisite: SOC 101-minimum "D" grade
SOC-120
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
Using a sociological perspective, this course will provide a background to current issues utilizing a multidisciplinary survey of the historical and cultural roots through which we have come to define sexuality and gender. The course draws upon a selection of theoretical perspectives and sociological case studies dealing with sexual and gender identity in order to provide a backdrop for analyzing current social and political issues shaping the struggles faced by sex and gender equity groups in Canada today.
SSWK-151
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course provides a basic introduction to social welfare policy in Canada, its historical development, and its role within the political and economic context of Canadian society. A major emphasis is placed on a review of the values and ideology implicit in various types of social welfare policy. Students will critically analyze the effect of social welfare policies on client populations and upon themselves as social service workers. Class discussions focus on northern issues.
SSWK-171
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
Students are introduced to the practice of social service, its values, knowledge, and skill foundations. The principles and contributions of mutual aid, self-help, and natural helping networks are examined. The relationship between social service practice and the communities and organizations in which it takes place is a focus of discussion. Other discussion topics include current trends in the field of paraprofessional services, ethics, and the basic structure and function of social service agencies.
WMST-101
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course uses a multidisciplinary approach to the study of women in society and academia. It explores interdisciplinary and historical perspectives on women and examines the development of feminist theories and methodologies. Emphasis is placed on the diversity of women's experience within the context of differences in class, race, age, and sexual orientation. The connections between women's experiences in the everyday world and their representation in Canadian institutions will be explored, with the aim of understanding the relationship between personal empowerment and social change.
WMST-102
CREDITS: 3
LENGTH: 15 weeks
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course uses the multidisciplinary approach to the study of women in society and academia developed in WMST 101. The course will focus on the critical examination of gender segregation in the paid labour force and its relationship to institutionalized representations of women in science and medicine, law, politics, religion, and family. Emphasis will be placed on Canadian institutions as well as class, race, and age differences between groups of women in Canadian society.